Thanks to Jeannie Cole for this blog post. Jeannie is a ReBoot Accel alum and former Digital Projects Manager. Currently, Jeannie is head of communications for DREME at Stanford University.


 

Let’s face it. Summer is a tough time to be searching for a job. Your kids are home, the family schedule is erratic, and you’d really like to get away from it for a while. What if you apply and your shot at an interview comes while you are out of town? What if . . . ?

Though your search may slow a bit due to the different pace, recruiters generally agree that it’s a mistake to put your search on hold over the summer. You will thank yourself later if you don’t lose momentum, and who knows? Maybe you will gain more attention in this less-busy season. Here are six things you can do to keep your job search fresh and moving forward.

 

1. Inventory your interests and skills.

If you are in the early phase of your return-to-work journey, you might still be figuring out what your second-stage career will be. If so, the change in routine that summer offers can be a great opportunity to mine your past experience for what you love (and don’t love) as well as for your dreams and aspirations. Navigating a career change takes both self-reflection and research, and summer is a great time for both.

 

Find out what you like doing best and get someone to pay you for doing it. – Katharine Elizabeth Whitehorn

 

2. Tune up your job-search assets.

If you have been searching for a while, or the process of searching has caused some shifts in what you are seeking, summer is a great time for a thorough assessment of your toolkit. Revisit your LinkedIn profile, resume, personal branding, and social media to make sure they communicate a consistent message. Read job descriptions and think about keywords to make sure that job search tools like LinkedIn and Glassdoor are offering up potential matches. And reflect on your storytelling–especially how you position your career pause–to be sure that you are ready to talk with confidence about what you have to offer.

 

All of us need to understand the importance of branding. We are CEOs of our own companies: Me Inc. To be in business today, our most important job is to be head marketer for the brand called You. – Tom Peters in Fast Company

 

3. Get feedback.

If you are visiting or hosting old friends, consider asking them for feedback on your strengths and weaknesses. Seeing yourself as someone else sees you can give you valuable insight and new ways to talk about what you have to offer in the workplace. A fresh perspective can help you gain confidence and reset your process if you are feeling frustrated or discouraged.

 

When we make progress and get better at something, it is inherently motivating. In order for people to make progress, they have to get feedback and information on how they’re doing. – Dan Pink

 

4. Network.

Yes, people often travel in the summer, but people are also less formal. Your social networking opportunities give you the chance to let people know you are looking and to meet valuable new connections.

 

Networking doesn’t have to be all about talking shop over appetizers and bad chardonnay – do it in a way that works for you. – Kathryn Minshew

 

5. Apply.

Losing momentum can be a vicious cycle. It’s easy to lose confidence if you feel stuck, and your loss of confidence can contribute to inaction. Identify a few jobs of interest and go for it! There is nothing like actually applying to keep improving your cover-letter writing and (hopefully) interview and pitch skills. Learn from your successes and failures, and keep your growth mindset sharp.

 

This is a wonderful feature of the growth mindset. You don’t have to think you’re already great at something to want to do it and to enjoy doing it. – Carol Dweck

 

6. Take breaks.

We all know that sometimes stepping back and resetting is just what we need to get a new perspective. Rest and reconnecting to what (and who) you love does wonders for your confidence and helps ensure you are on the right track, rather than running down a blind alley. Make time to unplug, enjoy nature, and pay attention to how you are feeling. We all make better decisions when we are rested and calm.

 

Rest until you feel like playing, then play until you feel like resting, period. Never do anything else. – Martha Beck

 

Good luck, and happy summer! And don’t forget, all of the above topics and more are addressed in ReBoot Kickstart, our FREE online job search skill training program. Sign-up today and get started.

What else are we reading this week?

Eight Tips to Making Your Summer Staycation More Satisfying

Six Summer Sizzlers For Career Returners

Returning to Work? Here’s Your Summer Reading List


Are you a job seeker returning to or pivoting your career? What’s next for you?

Check out ReBoot Talent JOBS. We proactively work with companies across the USA that are seeking skilled, mature talent returning to their careers. This is continually updated, so check back frequently.

Subscribe to ReBoot Kickstart, our new and FREE online training program with over 20 lessons, worksheets, and videos to help job seekers successfully return to and pivot their careers.

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Beth Kawasaki on Email
Beth Kawasaki
Prior to ReBoot Accel, Beth went from the marketing and advertising management of big brands at P&G, Apple Computer, and Levi Strauss to raising a family, earning her M.A. in theology and gender justice issues, and engaging in advocacy work on behalf of marginalized girls and women in developing countries and communities.

Beth believes in the life long career and social impact potential of women and is committed to helping them get current, connected, and confident to return to the paid workplace.

About Beth Kawasaki

Prior to ReBoot Accel, Beth went from the marketing and advertising management of big brands at P&G, Apple Computer, and Levi Strauss to raising a family, earning her M.A. in theology and gender justice issues, and engaging in advocacy work on behalf of marginalized girls and women in developing countries and communities. Beth believes in the life long career and social impact potential of women and is committed to helping them get current, connected, and confident to return to the paid workplace.

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